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Guide to Removing Stains From Your Kitchen Countertops

Countertops are not only utilitarian but also serve as the kitchen’s piece de resistance. Keeping them clean and bright is not only necessary for hygiene, but also to maintain the aesthetic value of your kitchen.

Due to their regular use, they tend to develop stains that are unsightly and give your kitchen a cheap, ugly look.

To keep your kitchen and countertops looking great, you need to remove the stains. How do you do it? Here is a guide on how to go about it:

Quartz countertops

Because of the nonporous nature, quartz countertops are relatively easy to keep stain-free. They are also scratch-resistant, making them suitable for a wide range of applications.

As time passes, stains on your quartz countertops may develop and become difficult to remove. Don’t panic if you have a big stain on your quartz kitchen countertop.

When you know what to do, eliminating it isn’t that tough. There are a few simple methods you can follow to remove even the most tenacious stains from your quartz surfaces.

You should start with blotting the stain. After this, mix a mild detergent (such as shampoo or dish soap) with warm water. Don’t use heavier detergents as they can damage the surface.

You should then dip a soft cloth in the mixture and apply it to the stain. Gently wipe the cloth over the stain in a circular motion for several minutes before rinsing it with warm water.

If the harsher stains remain on your countertop, you may need to repeat the technique several times.

If you have a difficult stain on your quartz countertop that won’t come out with mild detergent, try baking soda.

Making a paste of baking soda and water is an effective approach to remove persistent stains off quartz surfaces. Simply combine a few tablespoons of baking soda and equal parts water to make a paste.

You should then apply it to the stain and allow it to settle for a few minutes. After this, wipe it off with a gentle towel.

If you have tougher stains that baking soda won’t remove, use poultice as is a stronger, easier, and safer approach. To produce a poultice, use baking soda and hydrogen peroxide.

Apply the paste to the stain with a moist cloth and then wrap it in plastic. Allow the poultice to stay for a few hours before wiping it clean with a moist cloth.

Baking soda and hydrogen peroxide work together to remove the stain from the quartz countertop, allowing you to restore its natural brilliance. With a little effort, you can remove even the most stubborn stains from your quartz countertops.

Marble countertops

Marble is among the most porous natural stone materials available. With that in mind, any spills on the stone can easily get to the inner layers. To avoid this, you must clean them up quickly and within the shortest time possible.

If you leave the spills on the surface, your marble may be permanently damaged and you don’t want this, do you?

If removing the spill does not work and you wind up with a stain, don’t worry. You can remove most of the marble stains with poultice. A poultice will pull the discoloration from your marble and leave it clean and attractive.

Don’t worry if the poultice doesn’t work the first time. Reapply it and wait. If it still does not remove the stain, contact an expert to determine the best course of action.

The last thing you want to do when attempting to remove a stain from your marble is cause additional damage to it.

To avoid this, never attempt to remove a stain with bleach or other aggressive cleansers. Harsh cleaners include any acidic materials. Using these cleaners can wear down the marble’s surface and you don’t want this.

While marble is one of the most porous materials available, there is one important step you can take to reduce the likelihood of stains: sealing.

Sealing your marble countertop or other surfaces will stop the pores, preventing liquids and stains from passing through. Keep in mind that this seal won’t last forever. You will need to re-seal your countertops every several months.

Sealing the countertops is easy. Start by clearing and cleaning the surface. Next, apply the sealant. Depending on the product, you may need to apply the sealer with a brush or a spray bottle.

Apply the sealant to the marble and ensure that you cover the entire surface. After that, wait 15 minutes to observe the sealer.

If all of the sealer has been absorbed within 15 minutes, apply another coat. After you’ve finished waiting, wipe off any excess sealant and let your marble surface sit for 24 hours.

You can do the sealing by yourself but for the best outcome, let a professional help you out.

Concrete Countertops

Like marble, concrete countertops are highly porous. Due to this, applying a sealant to make the surface more resistant to stains and scratches is an important step toward preventing damage.

If you have stains on your concrete countertop, all is not lost. The staining could be the result of a poorly performing sealer failing to protect the concrete, temporary surface stains on a coating sealer, or staining agents getting into scratches on a high-performance coating sealer.

Before you start working on stains, first evaluate the situation.

Does the sealer appear to be unharmed, implying that this is most likely a surface stain on the sealer? 

If it does not, the sealer is most likely still intact, and you will only need to bleach out the surface stains.

Does the sealant appear to be destroyed, and the stain is in the concrete? Is the concrete simply discolored, or has it been etched away by an acidic substance (rough or pitted)? If the former, you can use bleach to remove the discoloration.

If the latter, you will need to repair the concrete before resealing, unless you want a rough patch to stay on your countertop.

Has oil penetrated through a scratch and blackened the concrete kitchen countertops Raleigh? You will need to apply a poultice to remove the oil.

How to Remove Stains From Your Kitchen Countertops

Countertops are the foundational feature of a busy kitchen, and keeping them in a condition where they’re as beautiful and bright as when you first got them is crucial not only for maintenance purposes but also because they bring character to your cooking space.

Unfortunately, due to the busy nature of the kitchen, most countertops tend to develop stains. Thankfully, you can remove these stains.

To help you out, here are some of the best tips to resort to, depending on the type of countertop you have, to guarantee that your kitchen looks great with no stains or markings that could depreciate its value.

Laminate countertops

Laminate countertops are made of plastic resins and are extremely stain-resistant. If you have a stain or mark from a spill or slip, spray a baking soda and water solution over the area before wiping with a clean cloth.

The most common cause of laminate damage is laying hot pots or pans on the surface, which can cause stains.

Coffee, wine, ink, and food stains are the most common on laminate counters. Depending on the type of stain, the procedure you employ to remove it may differ.

Begin by blotting the stain with a clean, dry cloth or paper towel if it is still new. Rubbing the discoloration will only push it deeper into the laminate, so don’t do it.

After blotting the stain, prepare a cleaning solution. The solution you prepare depends on the type of stain you have.

Combine warm water and a few drops of mild dish soap to remove general stains.

For grease stains, use warm water mixed with a few drops of dish soap or a grease-cutting cleanser.

To remove stubborn stains, prepare a baking soda and water paste.

Rub rubbing alcohol or acetone (nail polish remover) on ink stains. Apply a small amount on a cloth and dab the stain gently.

To avoid stains in the future and protect your countertops, wipe up spills immediately, protect the surface with cutting boards and hot pads, and avoid using harsh abrasives or scouring pads.

You also should make it a habit to use coasters or trivets at all times before placing anything down.

Quartz countertops

Because of their non-porous nature, quartz countertops are easy to maintain in terms of stain resistance. Since they are scratch-resistant, you can put almost anything on them.

Although quartz worktops are durable and stain-resistant, they can become damaged if spills are allowed to rest for an extended period of time. Thankfully, there are several ways of getting off the stains when they happen.

Start by preparing a cleaning solution. The solution you prepare depends on the type of stain you have.

Combine warm water and a few drops of mild dish soap to remove general stains. This solution will remove most of the stains on your countertops.

To remove stubborn stains, make a paste by combining baking soda and a tiny amount of water.

For oil-based stains such as grease or frying oil, use a 70% isopropyl alcohol and 30% water solution.

A 1:1 mixture of hydrogen peroxide (3-10%) and water is ideal for organic stains such as coffee, tea, or wine.

You can also use rubbing alcohol or acetone to remove ink stains.

To avoid future stains, wipe up spills as soon as they happen, protect the surface with cutting boards and hot pads, and avoid harsh abrasives or scouring pads.

Marble countertops

Because marble is porous, it is considered a ‘soft’ stone. The stone’s porous nature means it is easily damaged and stained.

You should start by blotting the stain with a clean, dry cloth or paper towel if the stain is new. Avoid touching the discoloration because it will spread.

To remove stubborn or deep stains, make a poultice. A poultice is a material that draws stains from the stone’s pores. The poultice you prepare depends on the stain you want to remove.

For organic stains (such as coffee, tea, and wine), make a thick paste by combining baking soda and water.

For oil-based stains (for example, grease), make a paste by combining baking soda and acetone or mineral spirits.

You can use acetone or hydrogen peroxide to remove ink stains.

Spread the poultice over the stained area, allowing it to spread slightly beyond the stain’s margins. To establish an airtight seal, wrap it in plastic wrap and glue the edges down. Allow it to sit for 24 to 48 hours, depending on the degree of the stain.

To avoid future stains, seal your marble countertop regularly (every 6-12 months, depending on use), and use cutting boards and hot pads to protect the surface. You also should make it a habit to wipe up any spills as soon as they happen.

Concrete Countertops

Since concrete is a porous material, it’s highly susceptible to staining.

You should create a cleaning solution appropriate for the stain you want to remove.

Combine warm water and a few drops of dish soap to remove general stains.

To remove stubborn stains, make a paste by combining baking soda and a tiny amount of water.

For oil-based stains, combine warm water with a few drops of dish soap, or use a 3-part water/1 part ammonia solution.

For the grease stains, remove them using ammonia.

Soak a cloth or sponge in 3 percent hydrogen peroxide to remove ink stains and lay it over the spot. To keep it moist, cover it in plastic wrap. Allow it to sit for a couple of hours or overnight.

After preparation, apply the cleaning solution to the stained area.

Clean and reseal the countertop regularly to prevent future stains from your kitchen countertops Durham. Use cutting boards and hot pads to protect the surface, and mop up spills immediately afterward.

What you Need to Know About Kitchen Countertops

In most households, the kitchen is the busiest room. Besides being used for cooking, kitchens are used for other purposes. For example, they are used as meeting spaces and even go-to serve as dining areas in homes without formal dining rooms.

Because so much time is spent in the kitchen, it is worthwhile to invest in them.

Kitchen renovations are high on many homeowners’ to-do lists, and once they commit to remodeling the room, they face a slew of considerations.

When remodeling your kitchen, you must decide which countertop material to choose. If this is where you are, here is a list of popular possibilities that will help you with that selection:

Quartz

Quartz is a low-maintenance and long-lasting countertop material. Quartz countertops are normally 94 percent ground quartz and come with a honed, sandblasted, or embossed treatment, making them appealing to homeowners with various notions about the perfect aesthetic of a kitchen countertop.

If not appropriately treated, quartz can crack, and edges and corners can chip with time. When you are in the market, go for countertops with rounded edges to reduce the possibility of chipping.

The costs of the countertops vary depending on region and product availability, but quartz is normally roughly the same price as natural stone.

Laminate

Laminate countertops are appealing to frugal households. The beauty of them is they are simple to install. Laminate countertops are available in various colors, textures, and styles.

Laminate countertops are also long-lasting, which allows frugal homeowners to stretch their budgets even further. Laminate worktops are simple to clean, but knives can permanently harm them, so always use a cutting board when preparing meals on laminate.

Although laminate is water-resistant, extended moisture exposure at seams or edges can cause swelling or warping. To prevent this from coming about, ensure that sinks are properly sealed. You also should avoid leaving wet rags or sponges on the surface.

Granite

No two slabs of granite are alike; this individuality has traditionally appealed to many homeowners. Heat, cuts, and scratches don’t affect granite too much, though this stone, like quartz, can split around edges and corners. So you need to be cautious when handling it.

Granite is a long-lasting material that can survive for decades if properly cared for. Granite is also nonporous, making it resistant to microorganisms.

Because granite is porous, you should seal it regularly to prevent stains. The frequency of sealing varies based on the type of granite and the sealer used, but it is wise to seal your countertops every 1 to 3 years.

To tell whether your countertops are ready for sealing, sprinkle a few droplets of water on the surface of your surface. If the water beads up, the seal is intact, but if the surfaces absorb the water, it’s time to reseal the stone.

Butcher block

Butcher block countertops are one of the more unusual alternatives available to homeowners. Butcher block countertops, sometimes known as “wood countertops,” are composed of fused wooden strips.

Butcher block is one of the more economical materials, but the final cost will be determined by location and availability.

Butcher block countertops are highly sensitive to fluids; therefore, you should limit the countertops’ exposure to moisture.

You can protect the butcher block countertops against bacteria and warping by sealing them soon after installation. Though butcher blocks can be difficult to maintain, many homeowners believe the unique aesthetic is worth the extra effort.

To have an easy time with your butcher block countertops, thoroughly seal them before using them. The best sealing material to use is food-safe mineral oil or a specialist butcher block oil.

The best way to do it is to allow a generous amount of oil to seep into the surface for several hours or overnight. Repeat this step every few weeks to keep the protective seal intact.

You also should oil your butcher block countertops regularly to prevent dryness, cracking, and staining. The frequency at which you oil the surfaces will depend on usage, but as a general rule, apply a light coat of mineral oil every 1 to 3 months or when the wood appears dry or dull.

Marble countertops

Many people liken marble to granite, but the two are different. Marble is a metamorphic stone, unlike granite, an igneous stone formed by crystallized magma.

While granite has a Mohs hardness value of 6-7, marble has a level of around 3-5. This is because marble is formed when pre-existing limestone or dolomite is subjected to high heat and pressure, causing calcite and carbonate crystals to reform.

Although marble is still a robust and long-lasting choice for kitchen worktops, it is softer than granite or quartzite, which means you must be more cautious about cleaning, maintenance, and the things you expose it to (acidic compounds, staining agents, and so on).

When in the market, choose a Carrara or Calacatta marble for its extraordinary beauty, adaptability, and unrivaled luxury appeal.

Concrete Countertops

While quartz, granite, and marble counters are popular among designers, concrete remains an attractive alternative, providing flexibility and creative potential that other materials cannot match. If you are looking for a unique kitchen centerpiece, a custom concrete countertop is a choice that gives you complete control.

The appeal of concrete is that it doesn’t limit you on how creative you can get. You can color it in various ways, pour it in any size or shape, and inlay it with other materials to create patterns beneath its surface.

For example, you can put shells, glass, metals, and other materials to give it a unique, appealing look.

While the countertop gives you room for creativity, you should be cautious so you don’t go overboard and detract from the natural beauty.

This calls for you to avoid extreme colors such as pink. You also should use timeless hues and patterns to ensure that the countertop remains functional even as trends come and go.

While concrete kitchen countertops Raleigh are easy to install, avoid installing them yourself, especially if this is your first time. Instead, let a professional help you out.

4 Problems With Concrete Countertops

Concrete countertops make excellent kitchen countertops for those that can’t afford marble or granite countertops. While the countertops are super affordable, and you can install them by yourself, they come with their fair share of negatives. Here are 4 common problems with concrete countertops and how to solve them:

They easily crack

The countertops can crack either soon after installation or later on down the line. The risk is heightened when you use poured in place concrete instead of pre-cast concrete.

Thankfully, you can prevent the cracks from coming about by adding rebar, fiber reinforcement, or wire mesh. If you do this, but cracking still happens, don’t fret as you can fix it. How do you do this?

Use a material that can bond to the concrete to restore its appearance and prevent liquid penetration that could stain the countertops. The material you use should be flexible and strong or stronger than concrete, so future cracking doesn’t happen.

You can seal the crack by yourself or hire a professional to help you out. If you opt to go the DIY route, start the process by cleaning the crack. If the oil or stains have penetrated the crack and discolored the concrete, address the stains before repairing the crack.

If the countertops are new and unstained, apply more sealer down into the crack by rubbing the sealer in with your gloved fingers. For you to repair the crack, the sealer should penetrate the crack and fill it.

A good sealer has low surface tension, so it readily wets out the concrete and has a low viscosity.

For best results, avoid topical sealers as they don’t penetrate and fill the cracks. This is because the sealers have low solid content.

Unlike other problems that worsen with size, it’s not the case with concrete cracks. The larger they are, the easier they are to fix, as it’s easier to get materials into the crack.

The countertops scratch easily.

Other than the countertops developing cracks, they also scratch easily, which can give your surfaces a cheap, ugly look. Thankfully, you can seal the minor concrete scratches and restore your countertops.

There are two ways you can do this: touch up the scratch with a sealer or reseal the entire slab.

When using a sealer, be cautious and ensure you are using the right one. As a rule of thumb, avoid a two-part sealer that you have to mix and spray onto your countertop with special equipment.

Your touchup kit should be as simple as possible. One of the best you can go for is the single-component sealer, such as acrylic.

When it comes to brushes, use a “spotter brush” that gives the best results as it’s fine and doesn’t hold a lot of sealer.

After you have touched up the scratch and the touchup is dry, adjust the sheen to match the surrounding finish, and if there is excess material in the touchup, use a razor blade to scrape off the excess.

They chip easily

Like marble and granite countertops, concrete surfaces can chip when they contact sharp objects near the corner of the countertops. The reason these areas are vulnerable is because there is little material available to resist the full impact of the pan, pot, or any other heavy object.

When there is a chip on your countertops, you can fix it in different ways depending on the chip’s nature. If the chip that came off is available and still intact, you need to glue it back on. On the other hand, if the chip fragment is unavailable, fill the damaged area with new material.

Regardless of the method you use, ensure the adhesive or filler you use color matches the countertops.

The countertops are prone to oil stains.

Since the surfaces are porous, they are prone to dark oil stains. Thankfully, you don’t have to undertake countertop replacement Durham when this happens, as you can get rid of the stains using a good poultice. An ideal poultice is a mixture of powdered sugar, baking soda, and flour with acetone.

Spread the poultice on the oil spot, then cover it with plastic wrap taped down to seal in the poultice.

How to Clean Your Countertop Without Damaging The Material

Kitchen countertops are one of the most frequently-used home items. More often than not, you would be using it even if you do not cook every day. It is usually where you put down your groceries, take-home meals, and other random items. Your kitchen countertop has also most likely experienced a lot of spills and scratches.

That said, your granite kitchen countertops may have already taken a beating over the years. Sure, you take pride in ensuring that your countertop is cleaned before you go to bed. But the question is this: how sure are you that your countertop is really clean from deep-seated dirt that has accumulated through the years?

There are different materials used for countertops – from quartz kitchen countertops, marble, granite, laminate, and so on. Each of these countertop materials has its respective benefits. Likewise, each of them has specific cleaning and maintenance requirements that need to be followed. Otherwise, it can damage the countertop material for good.

How to clean marble countertops

Marble material looks classic and elegant, whether as countertop or flooring material. It has different designs and colors you can choose from. However, marble countertops are prone to scratches and tend to stain easily. If you are a little OC than usual, you may find this annoying and may end up hiring a countertop replacement company to replace your countertop.

But the good news is that marble is generally easy to clean – much better if you keep it well-maintained every day. You don’t need to use commercial cleaners to clean your marble countertop. Here are some simple cleaning tips for these types of countertops.

  • Avoid using cleaners with an acid content, whether it’s a commercial or home-made cleaner containing lemon juice or vinegar. It can cause etchings and stain marks on the surface.
  • For deep-seated stains, use baking soda mixed with water, form it into a paste, apply on the stained area, and let it sit for around 24 hours before wiping it off. If it doesn’t work, you can consider hiring professional cleaning personnel instead.
  • Use a damp and soft cloth when wiping the marble countertop to prevent scratching the countertop material. Then wipe dry using a separate clean, dry cloth.
  • Use a product specially formulated for marble material. This can help make the countertop look like new again.

How to clean granite countertops

Some suggest cleaning granite countertops using commercial cleaners. Others say you should only use cleaners specially made for granite. It’s your call, but experts say there is no need to fight which option is better. You can use warm and soapy water, a microfiber cloth, and perhaps isopropyl alcohol. Here are other tips in cleaning a granite countertop.

  • Avoid using scrub pads in cleaning the countertop as it can possibly scratch its surface. You can also use a mild bleach solution to clean the countertop.
  • Mix baking soda and water, create a paste, and then scrub the mixture on the stained area using a soft brush. Let it sit for 24 hours before rinsing off. It may require reapplications to remove the stain completely.
  • Use a product specially formulated for granite and make the countertop look like new again.

How to clean quartz countertops

One of the major selling points of quartz is that it’s non-porous. Meaning, it won’t cause deep-seated stains, bacteria build-up, and scratching. But this does not mean you won’t clean it anymore.

You can use a commercial cleaner to maintain the quality of the countertop material. Or, you can also use gentle dish soap, warm water, and microfiber cloth to clean the countertop surface. Clean the surface immediately when spills occur.

How to clean other kitchen countertop materials

Here are other cleaning and maintenance tips for other countertop materials.

  • For wood countertops, use salt and sprinkle on light stains and scrub using half a lemon. Let it sit overnight and rinse with water and dry using a clean cloth. For darker stains, dab it with cotton with 3 percent hydrogen peroxide. Use mild dish soap, warm water, and clean cloth to wipe clean the surface.
  • For stainless steel countertops, use commercial cleaners specific for stainless steel material to remove smudges and other marks.
  • For glass countertops, use a glass or multi-purpose cleaner to wipe the countertop surface.
  • For ceramic countertops, use white vinegar to remove stains and to make the surface sparkling clean. Scrub the grout using mild bleach and old toothbrush and then seal with commercial grout sealer.

For your countertop needs, you can check out granite countertop installers in NC today.

How Long Does It Take To Replace Countertops?

Concrete countertops

Once you have decided replacing your old and out of date countertop, you might want to know how long it takes to replace the countertop. Well, it is not possible to generalize the time required for the kitchen countertop replacement. How much time required depends on several factors, such as –skills of handyman, countertop material used, availability of installation tools, size and shape of your countertop, and your budget.

Kitchen countertop replacement

No matter which type of countertop material you choose for countertop replacement, there is thing you need to keep in mind: Get started only after understanding the specifications. It is very much important that the person who is installing the countertop has the required skills and knowledge. If you are versed with general handyman tasks, you can take kitchen countertop installation in your hand. However, it is always recommended to hire a professional contractor for this purpose.

Laminate countertops

If you are looking for fastest turn-around, then laminate countertops is the best option for you. This is especially applicable when you select “off the rack” countertops from the countertop store. The finish and fit will not be as good as customized laminate countertops, but as far as time is concerned, they are unbeatable.

Engineered stone and stainless steel countertops

Installation time required for engineered stone and stainless steel countertops is almost same as the time required to install laminate countertops, and the process of installation is also same. From the time you begin to think about countertop replacement, plan at least 4 months. That provides you the time to explore what you really want without rushing.

Granite and marble countertops

Installation of natural stone countertops (like granite and marble) is quite different from the installation of engineered stone countertops. It is not possible to install these countertops using DIY hacks. You need a professional countertop contractor for the kitchen countertop replacement job.

Concrete countertops

Concrete countertop installation is tricky and time-consuming. There are a lot of things required to be taken care of while installing concrete countertops. The installation of concrete countertops can take up to a week, even when you hire a professional contractor.

 

Countertops and the Environment

kitchen countertop replacement

Choosing a kitchen or bathroom countertop is often about aesthetic value, durability and of course the price. However, these are not the only aspects that you should consider. A socially responsible homeowner should consider the impact of the countertop material on the environment and health. There are some countertop materials which are environmentally friendly while some materials are not safe for the environment. It is your responsibility to not to promote the use of materials that are dangerous to environment.

Choosing the environmentally friendly countertops

If you think that environmentally friendly countertop materials will not look good or will be expensive or will require more maintenance, then you are wrong. There are fantastic countertop materials which are not only environmentally friendly, but also fulfill needs and requirements of homeowners.

Natural stone countertops

Marble and granite are the most popular countertop materials. The good thing about these natural stones is that they are environmentally friendly. These countertop surfaces last for long period of time and are fully recyclable. However, process and transportation of these countertops requires a lot of energy, which is a big toll on environment.

Engineered quartz countertops

Engineered quartz is a manmade countertop material which consists of 90% quartz. This material utilizes polyester resin and pigments to get colors. The impact of quartz on environmental is low, as the raw materials are locally sourced, and fabrication also done locally. Thus, this manmade countertop is quite good in terms of environment friendliness.

Concrete countertops

Many homeowners think of concrete as a standard dray material, but painted concrete countertops are actually beautiful. Concrete is a good countertops material due to its to heat and scratch resistant quality. Manufacturing cement needs considerable energy and the concrete countertop processing create a lot more pollution than most countertop materials. The processing of the concrete countertop is not good for environment.

Wood countertops

Wood countertops are aesthetically pleasing. While cutting down trees may appear not safe for environment, but most wood countertops come from forests and made from fast growing tree species such as bamboo. Bamboo countertops are one of the most environmentally friendly countertops. However, their transportation is a big toll on the environment.

The Secret to Getting Great Kitchen Counters

countertop

You can find plenty of kitchen counter surfaces these days. Each material has its own pros and cons. However, the latest trend is stone, stone, and more stone. There are countless choices in stone countertops and all of them are exceptionally durable. Thus, if you are looking for great kitchen countertop, then explore a number of options available in the market.

Kitchen countertop options

When it comes to kitchen countertop surface, no other material can beat the stones. The biggest advantage of stone counters is that they can bear heat, wear and tear, stress, and spills without complaining. On the dark side, stone countertops are cold, expensive and tough on glassware. Check out the below mentioned kitchen countertop options to know which surface full fills the needs and requirements of your kitchen.

Engineered stone countertops

This type of countertop surfaces combines the colorful palette of solid surfaces and durability of granite. Engineered stone countertops are good for homeowners who want the look and feel of stone. A lot of color options and textures are available in the engineered stone countertops. The benefits of engineered countertops can be stated as-

  • Engineered stones are aesthetically pleasing.
  • Engineered stones remain unfazed by heat.
  • Engineered stones countertops have very good scratch-resistant property.
  • Engineered stones do not get affected by everyday spills.

Natural stone countertops

Natural stone countertop materials like slate, limestone marble and granite makes an incredible style statement. These counter surfaces come in a variety of grains, colors, textures and finishes that means it go with any design scheme.

Every natural stone has its own benefits. Granite has wonderful heat resistant quality. Marble and limestone provide perfect finishing and are cheaper as compared to granite countertops.

Concrete countertops

Concrete emerged out as a new trend in kitchen countertops. You can paint concrete countertops in any desired color, even embed stones, beads, jewels, and fossils. However, concrete countertops easily develop cracks and stains.

Stainless steel countertops

This countertop material can withstand all abuse without discoloring or rusting. Stainless steel countertops are really very easy to maintain and they keep their luster for years.

So, these are the popular countertop choices trending in the kitchen décor trends. No matter which countertop material you choose, do select apt granite countertop company for hassle free installation.

5 Great Countertops Materials: How to Choose the Best

Kitchen countertops

Are you looking for great countertop options? Are you interested in trying unconventional countertop materials? Or do you simply need cheap and reliable countertop material? Well, if your answer is YES, below mentioned litany can help you out in selecting the best countertop material for kitchen island as well as bathroom vanity.

Kitchen countertop materials

Nowadays, homeowners are looking beyond the convectional countertop materials (granite and marble). This is because now homeowners are much more interested in decorating their bathroom and kitchen in unique manner. Well, if you are planning kitchen or bathroom renovation, you can consider the below mentioned countertop material options:

Solid surface countertops

The acrylic and polyester countertops are gaining a lot of popularity, these days. Solid surface countertops are highly resistant to stains and scratches. Unlike natural stone countertops, it is possible to repair solid surface countertops. These countertops literally come in 100s of color and pattern options.

Plastic laminate countertops

Plastic laminated countertops are one of the most durable and hard-wearing countertop materials available in the market. Plastic laminate counters are generally made from kraft paper. These countertops can survive many years. This material is apt for both bathroom and kitchen countertops.

Ceramic tile countertops

If you are looking for beautiful yet cheap countertop material, then ceramic tile countertops can full fill all your needs and requirements. These countertops come in varieties of beautiful patterns. But don’t expect long lasting services from ceramic tile countertops. But always select the best countertop company.

Wood countertops

Wood countertops can give classic look to your kitchen and bathroom. Many homeowners avoid wood countertops because of mistaken perception that wood can harbor germs. In fact, wood provide 99.9 percent germ free countertop surface. However, wood countertops demand a lot of maintenance.

Concrete countertops

Concrete countertops look similar to natural stone countertops but they are available at cheaper price. They are more apt for bathrooms rather than kitchens. They prevent staining but are prone to cracking.

So, these are the popular countertop materials available in the market. Always choose reputable countertop company for purchasing countertops. Good countertop companies provide installation facility and offer genuine warranty on sold product.

Granite countertops or quartz countertops?

kitchen countertopsAre you looking for new bathroom countertops or kitchen countertops?  At The Countertop Factory we offer more countertop materials than any of our competitors.  In addition to granite and quartz, some of our most popular solid surface countertops include laminate countertops, concrete countertops, tile countertops, soapstone countertops and cement countertops.

A few of our most popular brands are Formica countertops, Corian countertops and Cambria countertops.  Butcher block countertops and recycled glass countertops are very popular for the kitchen while black granite countertops and stone countertops are very popular for the bathroom.  Granite is the most popular choice because there are hundreds of granite countertops colors from which to choose!  Call one of our countertop contractors today to get started.